BLOGas.lt
Sukurk savo BLOGą Kitas atsitiktinis BLOGas

Foot Arch Pain While Jogging

Overview
Arch pain is the term used to describe symptoms that occur under the arch of the foot. When a patient has arch pain they usually have inflammation of the tissues within the midfoot. The arch of the foot is formed by a tight band of tissue that connects the heel bone to the toes. This band of tissue is important in proper foot mechanics and transfer of weight from the heel to the toes. When the tissue of the arch of the foot becomes irritated and inflamed, even simple movements can be quite painful.


Causes
Over-stretching or tearing the arch pad causes the dull ache that is associated with arch pain. Pain is most keenly felt when weight is put onto the foot, or when pushing off the foot into the next stride. The pain of foot arch strain can be particularly acute after sitting for a long time, or when getting up in the morning. Those most susceptible to the condition are people with very high, rigid arches. The injury is also common in middle-aged people who have been inactive for a long period of time before suddenly increasing their physical activity. The injury is particularly common in runners and joggers.


Symptoms
Arch pain may have a variety of different causes. Proper evaluation and diagnosis of arch pain is essential in planning treatment. A good general guideline is to compare the injured side to the uninjured side. Injury may present itself as a distinguishable lump, a gap felt at that location, or a “crunchy” feeling on that spot caused by inflammation. The type, causes, and severity of pain are also good indicators of the severity of the injury.


Diagnosis
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can show tendon injury and inflammation but cannot be relied on with 100% accuracy and confidence. The technique and skill of the radiologist in properly positioning the foot with the MRI beam are critical in demonstrating the sometimes obscure findings of tendon injury around the ankle. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is expensive and is not necessary in most cases to diagnose posterior tibial tendon injury. Ultrasound has also been used in some cases to diagnose tendon injury, but this test again is usually not required to make the initial diagnosis.


Non Surgical Treatment
Treatment for flat feet and fallen arches depends on the severity and cause of the problem. If flat feet cause no pain or other difficulties, then treatment is probably not needed. In other cases, your doctor may suggest one or more of these treatments. Rest and ice to relieve pain and reduce swelling. Stretching exercises. Pain relief medications, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories. Physical therapy. Orthotic devices, shoe modifications, braces, or casts. Injected medications to reduce inflammation, such as corticosteroids.


Surgical Treatment
As with most surgeries, patients and physicians should consider the surgery only after other, less invasive treatments have proven unproductive. Indications for surgery include Pain. Inability to function. Failure to improve after a six-month course of specific, directed physical therapy. Failure to improve after using arch supports, orthotics, or ankle and foot bracing. Once patients are at that point, the good news is that the procedure has considerably better outcomes than more traditional flat foot surgery. In the past, surgeons would realign and fuse the three hind joints, which would cause patients to lose motion, leaving them with a significantly stiff hind foot, With these newer procedures, if the foot is still flexible, surgeons can realign it and usually restore a close-to-normal or functional range of motion in the joints.


Prevention
There are several things you can do to prevent pain on the bottom of the foot. Here are some tips to help you avoid this condition. Do simple stretches each day (See Plantar Fasciitis Exercises for a list of all exercises). Wear good shoes that fit properly and are appropriate for the activity you are participating in. Lose excess weight if possible. Build your stamina slowly, especially with new exercises. Rest and elevate your feet, whenever possible, keeping them at least twelve inches above your heart. Always follow your doctor?s instructions for treatment. Each day do a different activity. For example: one day ride your bike, and swim the next day.

Patiko (0)

Rodyk draugams

Comments are closed.